OpenBSD Journal

New Ports of The Week (February 23)

Contributed by jason on from the yet-another-not-quite-as-good-as-exchange-killer dept.

On 18th of February, Christian Weisgerber (naddy@) announced on the ports@ mailing list that the ports tree has been locked for OpenBSD 4.5. Nevertheless, there were 7 new ports for the week of February 16 to February 22:

Zarafa

Some ports had updates that users should be aware of. No ports were removed.

New ports, listed in the order they were committed to the tree:

  • mail/zarafa
    • Zarafa is a full-featured e-mail and groupware solution, focused towards clients using the MAPI standard. As an MS Exchange replacement, the Zarafa suite provides the following features:
      • Integration with existing Unix mailserver
      • Native mobile phone support
      • MS Outlook "Look & Feel" webaccess
      • Stable MS Outlook sharing (100% MAPI)
      This package provides the Open Source version of Zarafa. Note that zarafa is not connected to the build yet and won't be before next release.
  • mail/zarafa/libical/
    • libical implements basic iCAL protocols. This is a modified libical library for use with the Zarafa Outlook Sharing service.
  • mail/zarafa/libvmime/
    • VMime is a powerful C++ class library for working with MIME messages and Internet messaging services like IMAP, POP or SMTP. This is a modified libvmime library for use with the Zarafa Outlook Sharing service.
  • mail/zarafa/webaccess/
    • Zarafa provides full functionality web access with an Outlook "Look & Feel". It includes access to email, calendars, contacts, tasks, shared folders and Public Folders. The AJAX implementation with drag & drop support is used be competitive with desktop email applications. This package provides both web and mobile clients access to Zarafa.
  • math/py-scipy
    • SciPy (pronounced "Sigh Pie") is open-source software for mathematics, science, and engineering. It includes modules for statistics, optimization, integration, linear algebra, Fourier transforms, signal and image processing, genetic algorithms, ODE solvers, and more. It is also the name of a very popular conference on scientific programming with Python. The SciPy library depends on NumPy, which provides convenient and fast N-dimensional array manipulation. The SciPy library is built to work with NumPy arrays, and provides many user-friendly and efficient numerical routines such as routines for numerical integration and optimization. Together, they run on all popular operating systems, are quick to install, and are free of charge. NumPy and SciPy are easy to use, but powerful enough to be depended upon by some of the world's leading scientists and engineers. If you need to manipulate numbers on a computer and display or publish the results, give SciPy a try!
  • devel/cvstrac/
    • CVSTrac implements a patch-set and bug tracking system for CVS as a single self-contained executable, running as CGI, from inetd, or as a stand-alone web server.
      • Automatically generates a patch-set log from check-in comments
      • User-defined color-coded database queries
      • Built-in repository browser and Wiki
      • Minimal memory, disk and CPU requirements
      • Per-user access control
      • Uses SQLite, no heavy database engine dependency
      • Can be run from a chroot jail
  • www/ruby-httpclient
    • httpclient is a library to access web resources via HTTP.

Updated ports that users should be aware of:

  • net/pfflowd has been marked as 'broken'.
    Stuart Henderson (sthen@) states that this is 'a good opportunity to move your config to pflow(4) :-)'.
  • multimedia/xine-lib, from xine-lib-1.1.16.1 to xine-lib-1.1.16.2
    This is a SECURITY update; see CVE-2008-5239, CVE-2008-5240, TKADV2009-004 for more information.
  • databases/mysql, from mysql-5.0.75 to mysql-5.0.77
    Bugfix and SECURITY update.
  • www/lighttpd, from lighttpd-1.4.20 to lighttpd-1.4.21
  • net/quagga, from quagga-0.99.9 to quagga-0.99.11
    It is worth noting that the SNMP flavour was already broken, and has been disabled for now.
  • devel/glade3, from glade3-3.5.4 to glade3-3.5.7

(Comments are closed)


Comments
  1. By fialar (88.96.248.182) on

    Why is Zarafa included in ports? I couldn't see anything on its website about licensing and it looked like something you have to pay for. (Though you could download an evaluation version.)

    Comments
    1. By Maxime DERCHE (82.230.128.83) maxime@mouet-mouet.net on http://www.mouet-mouet.net/maxime/blog/

      > Why is Zarafa included in ports? I couldn't see anything on its website about licensing and it looked like something you have to pay for. (Though you could download an evaluation version.)

      "This package provides the Open Source version of Zarafa. Note that zarafa is not connected to the build yet and won't be before next release."

      Comments
      1. By condor (84.56.184.227) cond on

        > > Why is Zarafa included in ports? I couldn't see anything on its website about licensing and it looked like something you have to pay for. (Though you could download an evaluation version.)
        >
        > "This package provides the Open Source version of Zarafa. Note that zarafa is not connected to the build yet and won't be before next release."

        The Zarafa source code is licensed under the AGPLv3 license.

        Comments
        1. By Anonymous Coward (70.173.232.205) on

          > > > Why is Zarafa included in ports? I couldn't see anything on its website about licensing and it looked like something you have to pay for. (Though you could download an evaluation version.)
          > >
          > > "This package provides the Open Source version of Zarafa. Note that zarafa is not connected to the build yet and won't be before next release."
          >
          > The Zarafa source code is licensed under the AGPLv3 license.

          Oh yeah, the AGPLv3, the GPL with extra 'freedom' that requires you to distribute changes to all network users of your (typically web) app, not just distributors.

          Software Freedom marches on.

  2. By Phil Collins (79.65.154.40) on

    Lovin' the Windows screenshot!

    Comments
    1. By jason (jason) on http://www.dixongroup.net/

      That's what they had available on the Zarafa site. You don't think I'm going to install that on my server just so I can take a screenshot, do you? :)

      Comments
      1. By Anonymous Coward (114.30.119.39) on

        It looks like its a web app, so... uh... maybe?

        Comments
        1. By jason (jason) on http://www.dixongroup.net/

          Of course it's a web app. What difference does that make? Install it on your own server.

          Comments
          1. By Anonymous Coward (70.173.232.205) on

            > Of course it's a web app. What difference does that make? Install it on your own server.

            But be sure to make the source code available to every user, as required by the AGPL.

  3. By jason (jason) jason@dixongroup.net on http://www.dixongroup.net/

    For continuing to put together the weekly NPoTW. This story is a major time suck, having someone organize it and submit it to Undeadly is a big help.

    Comments
    1. By Maxime DERCHE (82.230.128.83) maxime@mouet-mouet.net on http://www.mouet-mouet.net/maxime/blog/

      > For continuing to put together the weekly NPoTW. This story is a major time suck, having someone organize it and submit it to Undeadly is a big help.

      Oh you are welcome... Following ports-changes@ and the RSS feed @openports.se, and building a HTML text of it is not a problem to me. You helped me to do it the first time (I eventually made my own NPoTW HTML template, by the way), and you do a great job every day, so you are the one who deserve the "thank you" :).

      Comments
      1. By Anonymous Coward (98.127.110.254) on

        Get a room, you two ;)

  4. By matthew emmett (129.128.207.226) on

    thank you eric@!

    openbsd is a great platform for research. a big part of that is due to the excellent ports and port system. new ports like scipy make it even better. thanks for all the effort.

    matt

  5. By Markus Hennecke (markus) markus-hennecke@markus-hennecke.de on http://www.markus-hennecke.de/

    An information for those who like to try cvstrac on 4.4-stable: You have to pull in the changes to rlog so that it will support the -d switch. This was a little bit confusing as the usage output of rlog told me that -d was not supported, while listing -d in the available options. The man page also listed the -d option.

    Comments
    1. By sthen (2a01:348:108:155:216:41ff:fe53:6a45) on

      > An information for those who like to try cvstrac on 4.4-stable: You have to pull in the changes to rlog so that it will support the -d switch. This was a little bit confusing as the usage output of rlog told me that -d was not supported, while listing -d in the available options. The man page also listed the -d option.

      Yes, I made sure to mention this in the commit log, but it doesn't hurt pointing it out here too - thanks.

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